Getting Out of Your Head and Into Your Heart

I participated in a workshop, the other day, where the audience was urging the person on the hot seat to “get out of her head and into her heart.” The hapless woman looked like she was frozen in an infinite loop of thought patterns, unable to let go and allow her true essence to shine through. As for me, I was infuriated with the crowd’s exhortation. You may ask why would I take issue with something that looks like a
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Why Ask Why?

Experts in effective communication will often tell you that asking someone a “Why?” question will automatically put them in a defense mode. We are not talking here about material causes and effects or technical problems; rather we are talking about reasons for choices and behaviors. Why, then, when asked a “Why?” question do we feel accused? Why does this question trigger an attempt at justification, rather than exploring potential causes? Our mind instinctively begins to search the quickest solution to
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Walking Blues

Starting with Robert Johnson’s Walking Blues, many a blues song begins with “When I woke up this mornin’…” With all due respect to Robert Johnson, this is no coincidence. Before you awake in the morning, are you there? Is there a “you” to be worried about whether your “baby started her low down ways”?… It depends on what it is you call “you.” When we awake from dreamless sleep, at first, there is no thought, and therefore no identification with
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Knowing vs. Believing

I mistakenly thought, when I chose this topic for this blog post, that I would easily be able to make my point. However, the more I looked into the subject, the more I realized that pinning down a definition for “knowledge” and “belief” was an uphill battle. So instead of presenting to you a coherent, well thought out and well researched essay, I will just share my musings with you. When all else fails, turn to Wikipedia. The entry for
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Letting Go — It Never Worked

Japanese Zen master, Tanzan, who lived in the late 19th century, tells this famous story of traveling with fellow monk, Ekido, down a road to a muddy river crossing. Reaching the river bank, they encountered a lovely young woman in her beautiful silk kimono, unable to cross without ruining her clothes. Without hesitation, Tanzan graciously lifted the woman into his arms and carried her across the muddy river, then carefully placed her onto dry ground. Ekido remained silent, until hours
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